What keeps you awake at night? For many millennials, it’s the stress of thinking about things that they may not understand or have control over.

Question-and-answer platforms made it easier for those searching for answers to an unlimited number of questions to find the answer(s) they were looking for. But today, search engines have become extremely voluminous, comprehensive, and most of all, time-consuming. It takes forever to find what you’re looking for.

Google processes over 3.5 billion searches each day, demonstrating a strong, global affinity for navigating the internet. The problem is learning how to intelligently and efficiently navigate the web in order to find whatever it is you may be looking for.

So, what can be done to help users streamline their questions and search queries with a useful tool that helps conserve their time? It starts by connecting users with individuals who are willing, ready, and able to connect them with an answer to their question or problem.

One company, Anything App, is one such search engine that provides the user with a list of individuals who are immediately available to chat, call, or even have video conversations with them based on search queries or questions the user may have.

Whether you need help fixing something, identifying particular medical symptoms, troubleshooting a computer issue, or learning about tourist attractions in a particular city, Anything provides a one-stop shop for users’ needs.

Obviously, blockchain tech comes into play, allowing for immediate and seamless payments between buyers and sellers of services. Search engines were initially designed to connect users with service providers. With the advancement of technology, we as individuals have become disconnected from one another, resorting to technology to solve all our issues. The problem is that technology is not smarter than us. Yet.

“Finding entertainment is easy, but searching for a solution to a particular problem is often a disaster on the web,” says Lodewijk Veldhuijzen, CEO and Co-Founder of Anything App.

We all need to capitalize on the general and specialized knowledge which we’ve spent thousands of dollars and gone into debt in order to acquire.

You Don’t Know What You Don’t Know

At the end of the day, you don’t know what you don’t know. Therefore, it’s important to get to the very bottom of what you are looking for, regardless of the industry you’re in—you have to understand what you are searching for. For example, when practicing law and researching cases for a client, it’s important to start with general queries to identify specific keywords, target words, and search terms, which will eventually narrow down what I am looking for, bringing me to a narrowly tailored selection of cases that may or may not be applicable to my client’s situation.

Bridging The Gap

The digital age has created a sense of immediacy and convenience in our daily routines. Thus, having multiple apps that eventually get us to the solutions or answers we desire makes no sense. It’s time we streamlined our desire and quest for knowledge with the technology we have available to us, and once again, harmonize the scale of human knowledge with technological tools to facilitate our knowledge and skills. Says Veldhuijzen, “Having access to instant two-way communication with experts in any field will shatter conventional methods of acquiring knowledge.”

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I am a criminal defense/internet attorney, writer and law professor in Dayton, Ohio. Born and raised in Dallas, Texas. As a millennial, I’m able to provide a unique perspective on social media crimes that occur on social media platforms, as well as advocating for the growth of new technologies and digital monies, while balancing the privacy risks associated with buying into such areas, as it affects its users, specifically young children, millennials, adults and businesses. I studied on Semester At Sea in 2011, traveling to 12 countries, including Brazil, Ghana, South Africa, India, Vietnam, China and Taiwan, studying how technology affects children and young teens in these countries in comparison to the U.S. I also work as a consultant for ABC, FOX and NBC across Dallas and Ohio on the latest news in the technology law realm. For more information, follow my #CYBERBYTE series.