The Brave browser has always been touted as a way to change the way people browse the internet and deal with advertisements. After over a year of development, it now seems the latter part will finally be achieved. The Brave Ads Trial Program has been launched, which will show the entire world how the concept of online ads can be improved upon.

Brave Ads Are Finally Coming

The Brave browser has been well-received by its users so far. It offers a very fast browsing experience, and it does seem to give users the experience for which they have been asking for several years now. Compared to Chrome, the Brave browser is extremely fast. Even when going head to head with Firefox, its speed advantage can’t be denied.

However, there is still a lot of work to be done. One of Brave’s main selling points is that it will allow users to either block ads entirely, replace traditional advertisements with whitelist banners, or allow users to earn money for viewing advertisements at all times. This latter option will certainly attract a lot of attention from users, mainly because people are always looking for ways to make money by doing the same tasks they complete every single day.

To that end, the Brave Ads Trial Program has now gone into effect. While it is a first iteration, it shows how things can be improved from here on out for the average internet user. Being able to watch ads and get paid for it – rather than just have them clog up one’s computing resources – is certainly a nice change of pace. There are no valid alternatives in this regard, at least as of right now.

During the trial period, users will see a “few relevant ads” a few times per day. That seems to be a rather sensible approach, and it will hopefully break the monotonous aspect of seeing the same “relevant” advertisements on every single site one views. It is evident Brave can make a big impact in this regard, assuming the team does it right.

For every advertisement a user views, he or she will earn BAT tokens. That money will come from advertisers, as Brave will share 70% of those profits with the end user. It is quite a steep amount, although no one should expect to get rich overnight or make any sustainable income from watching ads within the Brave browser all day.

It will be interesting to see what type of feedback users provide in this testing phase. Users’ browsing histories will be sent to the Brave team, so those who value their online browsing privacy should probably not partake in the trial. 

All things considered, this breakthrough is a major milestone for the Brave team. While many people doubted the company could actually change the way people browse the internet and view advertisements, it seems things are coming together nicely. Whether or not this means the Brave browser will gain mainstream traction moving forward is a different matter altogether. There is a lot of fierce competition in this market, after all.